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their historical significance and view the landscape today. from washington's crossing of the delaware to the battle of her clan. it's about an hour, 15. [applause] >> the subtitle of this book is an old irishman not being funny, so it's a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known two geniuses in my life. one is dead and the other robert sullivan is alive although that robert sullivan is not the robert sullivan who is with us this evening. not exactly, but more about that in a moment. first this robert sullivan is the author of seven extraordinary books, meadowlands, the whale hunt, how do not to get rich, rats, cross-country, the thoreau you don't know and the one that brings us here to delancey st., "my american revolution." in my humble opinion each of these books is in its way a masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive, e. tizon investigation of the american mindscape and sulzgeber related with the american landscape. each confronts the obvious, where there are garbage drunk -- garbage dump or a family road trip or a transcend
. from washington's crossing of the dollar to the battle of brooklyn, it is about an hour and 15. [applause] >> this subtitle of this book is old irishman. it is a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known to geniuses in my life. one is dead, and the other, robert sullivan, is alive. although that reversal in is not the robber solomon he was receiving. not exactly, but more but then the moment. first, brazil and is the author of seven extra hour bucks. meadowlands, will hunt, how not to get rich, rats, cross-country , the throw you don't know, and the one that brings us here, my american revolution. in mine and humble opinion each of these books is its own line and masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive. each is an investigation of the american my state and song skate into relative with the american landscape. fleet contends the obvious, whether a garbage dump comes or the species despise rodents or family richard or a transcendental and back and allows us to see what we didn't and will we couldn't will we didn't want to,
from both france and in washington sent a telegram to the embassies, which is not far away and i might telegram there was a message from kissinger, secretary of the state department, telling us the israelis, wait. hold your horses. do not take action because kissinger is going to move on with provided doctors. when the telegram was sent from the state department to the embassy during yom kippur, the egyptian and syrian armies were already on their way to destroy the jewish state. that is an example of a mistake because the leader at the time, she was afraid to take a preemptive attack. she was afraid to hold the reserve because she said i don't know what will be the reaction in washington. and dr. kissinger was very strong. nixon was going down, he was going up and she was afraid from his reaction. because of her approach, we almost lost the world. that is why today we do with the issue of iran, we have to take the decision which is good for israel. maybe it will not be popular in the u.n. for sure. everything you say about israel and the standard of the one sponsored by u.s. money of
when i first came to washington after my doctorate and one of the first books i was exposed to was tom's book titled the state of ridge, where the government sponsored enterprise in the financial crisis, clearly tom was years ahead of his time at his predictions turned out to be all too accurate. a very long track record of being one of the 04 most forecasters of the state of the financial-services industry but when he is not writing books he spends his time as a fellow at the center for dance to governmental studies at johns hopkins university. tom also served as staff on the financial crisis inquiry commission and in my opinion there are a few things i would disagree with the commission's findings one thing i know for certain is the commission's report was stronger because of tom's involvement. the book is also informed largely by tom's experience on commission staff. we are fortunate to have with us alex pollock to offer his thoughts on the book. alex is resident fellow at the american enterprise institute. i got to know alex a decade ago when he was president and chief operating of
, >>> and now joining us on booktv is an old washington hand and that is ambassador stewart. he's an author, the future of jews is the name of the book. ambassador, why are you writing a book about the future of the jews? >> we have survived 3,000 years of calamityies and we survived and leave thrived and contributed to societies even those that didn't want us. now we have a whole new set of 21st century challenges, and the question is having survived those terrible times, can we now survive prosperity, success, and integration? and i look at this from two perspective, the global forces that affect america, american jews, and israel, everything from the shift of power to united states and the west to china and the east hours of globalization in the digital era. how to deal with the 1.6 muslims in the world, the threat of iranian nuclear power, and i also look at internal threats, low birthrates, assimilation, and again, whether we can, in effect, succeed at the time when we are more successful than ever in being integrated to our society. it's a new know mom that. --
america: the war within the war for afghanistan, washington post senior correspondent rajiv command sake ran reports on the military and the government's failings in the war in afghanistan. nancy gibbs, editor at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine, chronicle the relationship of the u.s. presidents in "the presidents club: inside the world's most exclusive fraternity." and kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications 2012 notable book selections, visit or our facebook page, >> in 2008 judge robert bork sat down with eugene meyer, president of the federalist society, on booktv's "after words," an hourlong interview program. judge bork discussed a collection of his written works spanning nearly four decades. this interview was taped at judge bork's home in virginia. judge robert bork died on december 19, 2012. >> host: why did you, why did you collect "a time to speak," and is this just
$632 for our price, the kennedy half dollars in this collection are basis the washington quarters are $119 on the set on in quebec when bases, susan b. anthony collection are $30.and let me explain to you but this is. you will get a united government issue and said and what it is let me get these outa collection of coins and this is just a clear and here, it is hard but this shot is spectacular but it is all of the uncirculated coins this is one year and this is 1980, this is of the brilliant uncirculated coins . you're about 75ยข a coin and there are three susan b. anthony and this collection 1983 susan b. anthony. there is also 1979 susan b. hatch is what you will happen here we have $42 worth+ susan b. anthony brilliant uncirculated. the man goes in and circulated as well.% you look of those civil get all of the kennedy half dollars in you will get 20 years, 40acts because the chair has philadelphia mint and memory, 68 and 69. [reading] you will get in here6 c13 me go here, 1976 and up and get into this at but how about to eisenhower dollars that you will happen here. i do th
& prose bookstore in washington, d.c., and it's about an hour. [applause] >> hey, thanks a lot. and and sorry for keeping everyone waiting. you-had a chance to finish reading my book in that time. [laughter] so i probably don't need to say anything about it. so i'll just say a few things, um, about what's in my book, and then maybe we can talk about it. as i've been sort of doing some interviews with my book, a favored way of interviewers to sort of begin the conversation is to say the rich have always been with us, after all. and, actually, that's not true. and one of the points, really the starting point of my book is to say, actually, things are different now. and we really need to be aware of this new political and economic reality that income inequality has grown hugely in the united states and in the western industrialized world and, indeed, around the world and that a lot of the action is at the very top -- is that better? okay. i'm so short, i have to move the mic. a lot of the action is at the very, very top of the income distribution. so to just give you a quick sense
as one and it's in the book washington state university, the student wrote a play called the passion of offending of a buddy. he put it on the ticket. he put it everywhere. it isn't easily defended and this african-american student had the absolute goal of defending everybody and he made a point of it defending it all throughout. the university worked with students angry about the content of the play and they told them to stand up in the middle and shout i am offended which is ironic because that is the point of the play. it's going to go over badly. and the university president actually defended the next day. the students that disrupted the play as saying this was a very irresponsible exercise of the freedom of speech on the part of the angry mob of students that shut down the play and its stunning that they got that one. it's a great point and the censorship campuses. >> my name is dave clemens from ontario. i was wondering if you see any room for fire to expand into canada. i think there's a great group in canada. my only thing is i think the death of a nonprofit caused them to sp >> washington post correspondent and author, the newest book "little america, the war within the war for afghanistan." mr. chandrasekaran, when you talk about the little war, what are you talking about? >> the communities built in southern afghanistan, not in the last couple years, but six decades ago back when unknown to most of the country mern, there were dozen of americans engineers there back in the 40s and 50s, digging canals, building dams, helping to nation build in afghanistan, and the very same terrain that president obama's troops surge unfolded in over the last couple years. in my history of obama's serge and examination of it, i actually start back in the 1940s in the remarkable period of american resistance to afghanistan, a period of great optimism when we built the town there that the afghans started to call little america, complete with a co-ed high school, a swimming pool where boys and girls swam together, a clubhouse to get a gin and tonic, and it was a period of great promise for the americans and afghans, and i use that as the opening for this book that talks ab
washington post," david is a renowned writer of fiction and nonfiction and is later during his most recent string of best-selling works of spy fiction. david is well known for his command of international affairs and his keen insight into the working of government and other factors. with these two gentlemen, we're poised for an illuminating an intriguing conversation about the world, the future and revenge of geography. bald and david, over to you. >> thank you. i think you're probably not supposed to see this as a serious moderator, but i love this book. it's embarrassing how architect it is and how many post its mouth i put not to flatter the teacher but because i really liked it. i'm going to try to walk the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about t
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11